NOTES FROM THE STUDIO

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  • THE AUTONOMY OF PERIPHERAL CLOCKS

    THE AUTONOMY OF PERIPHERAL CLOCKS

    With such a short time available to begin digesting the wealth of experiences I had in the Arctic I am somewhat relieved that I can't help but return to the theme of forced desynchrony. If nothing else this thematic obsession saves me from becoming overwhelmed with too many subjects. There's time for that later but for now I spend my day revisiting some of the original research which informed my project.

    One article of particular significance comes from The Scientific American TIME edition (January 2012) titled 'Time of our Lives' by Karen Wright. Wright sites various studies and quotes from researchers which describe the 'orchestra-like' composure of our circadian systems as well as the recent discovery that every cell in the body has the potential to run on it's own circadian rhythm depending on various external inputs (food/light/excercise etc.) Eg. studies of forced desynchrony or arrhythmic life styles, like shift work, can seemingly set different parts of the body to different time zones.

    When I first begun to read about this concept I was bombarded by mental images- drawings and paintings I'd like to make of this phenomena. On revisiting the same articles and research- post Polar Night Study, I now have the hindsight of my own physical and mental experiences in the Arctic to begin to articulate my drawn expressions much more clearly.

    I spend most of my day reading, writing and sketching. Finishing with two very simple drawings that I'm pleased enough with as points of departure for my next developments on the theme.